Thoughts on Disney's Alpha Centauri Expiditions?

In case you never heard of that l, let me pull some text out of the wiki on the Disneyworld Avatar park

Disney and Lightstorm decided to set the land's timeline a generation after the warring conflict between the indigenous Na'vi and the Resources Development Administration (RDA) that sought to exploit Pandora for its unobtanium in the first film.[19][35] According to the backstory, the Na'vi and humans have achieved peace and Alpha Centauri Expeditions (ACE)–a fictional tourism company–has partnered with the Na'vi to present Pandora as a new destination for ecotourism and scientific research.[36] As a result, ACE established the Pandora Conservation Initiative to preserve and study the native Pandoran species.

I'm not sure if it's considered cannon. But it could be as it's set far after when the movies would be taking place.
 
i think it occupies the weird netherspace that the old official games do, in that before way of water came out it was considered official canon but now it's not.
it also occupies a slightly different netherspace in that the concept just fundamentally doesn't mesh well w the lore but it exists because disney wants to have a physical attraction for the series.
 
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I think Yrel hits the nail on the head. It's a weird pseudo-canon to try and make the physical theme attractions work. I'm guessing kicking it a generation down the line is an attempt to give it some future proofing from whatever is coming in the movies, as you can retcon something in the gap to make it line up. I just hope they don't try and shoe-horn it into the movie canon as that would be sooooo awkward.
 
As a former Terminator fan, I recall in our old fan-base we always had to deal with the similar dubious canon of a Universal Studios attraction called T2-3D: Battle Across Time, in which James Cameron was also involved. The plot of the attraction broke the existing Terminator lore as well, but because time travel is central to the plot of the Terminator franchise, it could more or less be put into an alternate timeline. But still it broke some internal logic of the franchise and subsequent movies never made any reference to it. Generally we took only the interesting things as canon and discarded what didn't make sense, since there were no clear canon guidelines anyway.

In case of the Avatar attraction from Disney, I would say I didn't like the concept when I first heard of it. Firstly, I thought the whole plot and setting felt too sugary and as subtle as getting an anvil with morals carved into it dropped onto your head. Secondly, I think the Avatar franchise just doesn't work well as a physical park attraction. It just goes against the central logic of the franchise, by being dumbed down and turned into capitalistic merchandise. Also, since Na'vi culture draws so heavily from existing human cultures, putting those on display in a physical park like that just feels wrong to me.

Apparently, according to Joshua Izzo, this attraction, officially called Pandora: The World of Avatar is indeed canon.
 
In case of the Avatar attraction from Disney, I would say I didn't like the concept when I first heard of it. Firstly, I thought the whole plot and setting felt too sugary and as subtle as getting an anvil with morals carved into it dropped onto your head. Secondly, I think the Avatar franchise just doesn't work well as a physical park attraction. It just goes against the central logic of the franchise, by being dumbed down and turned into capitalistic merchandise. Also, since Na'vi culture draws so heavily from existing human cultures, putting those on display in a physical park like that just feels wrong to me.
Can't agree enough. :\ I wouldn't stop anyone from wanting to experience it, but it's also felt wrong to me, personally.
 
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Secondly, I think the Avatar franchise just doesn't work well as a physical park attraction. It just goes against the central logic of the franchise, by being dumbed down and turned into capitalistic merchandise. Also, since Na'vi culture draws so heavily from existing human cultures, putting those on display in a physical park like that just feels wrong to me.

That is spot on, IMHO. It is pretty much the antethesis of the story.
 
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